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Costruire un Player Mp3 Basato su un PIC16F877

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tramite YourITronics di Florin il 04/02/10

DIY Mp3 Player Based On PIC16F877

This pocket sized mp3 player is based on Microchip PIC16F877 and comes with both C and Assembly source code but the C code version has more features and stability. The mp3 player was designed to work with compact flash cards up to 100 gigabytes. For decoding it uses the VS1001K chip and for conversion it uses the built in DAC. The principle of operation is not very complicated, the PIC reads the CF card and once it finds a file it clocks the card 512 times per sector sending all the information one byte at a time to the decoder chip. The decoder gets a valid stream of data and sound comes out of the built in DAC. The project doesn't have a display or a fancy menu, it's just a plain simple mp3 player.

DIY Mp3 Player Based On PIC16F877: [link]



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Usare un oscilloscopio per visualizzare logiche digitali

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tramite Hack a Day di Mike Szczys il 11/02/10

[Mike Bradley] wanted to use his oscilloscope to display 8 channels of digital signals. Alas, the analog unit didn't have this capability. Not to worry, he threw together an adapter module that does the trick. Using a PIC 18F26K20 microcontroller he inputs four or eight channel digital logic (at 5V) and filters the output to an analog signal that the oscilloscope can interpret. What you see in the photo above is the result.



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Come costruire un Hard Drive Clock con Arduino

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tramite HacknMod.com - You name it. We hack it. di Joe L il 02/02/10

Ah…the Arduino. The super powerful, easy to program microcontroller brings us another fantastic DIY project. We've seen a few hard drive LED clocks in the past, but this one looks outstanding and is easier to create. It uses POV (persistence of vision) to create the illusion of a clock while the drive is spinning. The code will be released soon and you can also view more details about the project. You can buy dirt cheap LEDs for your projects in our store.

Useful Links:



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Tavolo a led interattivo

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tramite adafruit industries blog di adafruit il 22/01/10

Fast-Talk-46-Mcgrew-1

Nice little blurb… LED-Inflused Coffee Table @ Fast Company

McGrew, 35, and Northrup, 32, are a husband-and-wife design team who have completed projects for Wikipedia, Clif Bar, and Timbuk2, and recently collaborated with open-source hardware designers Evil Mad Science to create interactive LED-infused coffee tables.

McGrew: "We have three tables — the Wave, the Ripple, and the Pulse — with the same lighting on the inside. They see change and light up in response. If you set something down on it, it lights up, but then calms down and stops twinkling. When you move that item, it will light back up again."

Northrup: "We wanted to showcase two different ways you can use light. The Wave typically has a glass top, so you're seeing everything — the circuit board, the LEDs, the patterns they're making. The Ripple and the Pulse are more of a secret because they have this frosted top that just looks like a really nice table. When you interact with one of them, it becomes more than a table. You get this second, wonderful experience."

McGrew: "The two big problems LEDs have always had — they weren't very bright and were very expensive — are going away. We're leveraging whatever we can get our hands on to help us make cool stuff."



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Clessidra controllata con Arduino

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tramite Embedded projects from around the web di admin il 24/01/10

Sand timers are still common in many areas. They are like time counting symbols and can be recognized of its special shape with sand tanks and thin tunnel allowing sand flow from top to bottom. The only downsize of such timers is that amount of sand is limited and you always have to turn it over after sand leaks out.

USB Hourglass from alwynallan on Vimeo.

Why to do it yourself – leave this task for Arduino like in this project. It uses an Arduino board that controls whole process, a stepper motor which rotates sand timer when needed and an optical sensor which determines when its time to rotate. But this isn't it. This so called USB hourglass also uses optical sensors light beam as random number generator. Because falling sand produces some kind of chaos, so the light beam intensity produces some entropy that is sent to PC via USB. This way 10 bit ADC generates random numbers at 100 Hz frequency. Well this is really nice and handy desktop toy.

I can imagine that many years ago some man had to watch sand timer and turn it over periodically in order to know exact time or time interval. Sounds like fun…



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Elicottero RC con 6 rotori

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tramite HacknMod.com - You name it. We hack it. di Joe L il 15/02/10

We've seen an Arduino powered 4-rotor copter, but if that's not enough you can upgrade to six individual rotors with this hexacopter. As you can see in the video below, this thing can read some incredible speeds with precision control. The author also includes full build plans. Still not enough? The same author has a video for an 8-rotor helicopter too.

Onboard is a GPS module for stability as well as individual circuitboards for each motor. Definitely an impressive build, check out more aerial posts below:

Popular Airplane & Copter Posts:

Via



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Arduino Overclocked

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tramite Liquidware Antipasto di Matt il 16/02/10
Sometimes I just get this idea in my head, and no matter how stupid or impractical it may be, I'm not going to stop until it's done. Talking about Open Source Hardware theory, economics, and strategy so much recently is making my head explode with ideas, so I figured it was time for a gratuitous display of silly engineering. And with that, I'm quite pleased to present the world's first overclocked, liquid cooled Arduino :-)

This is a picture of the Arduino completely submerged under Eco-Earth FluidXP Non-Conductive coolant:






This is a shot of me holding up the Arduino just slightly out of the coolant, which I chilled by putting in the freezer for about 20 minutes, and also keeping it chilled while transporting it with a cold compress:



The overclocking part wasn't so bad, but the problem with overclocking the Arduino is that once you swap out the crystals or tamper with the oscillator circuit in general, you can't really program the Arduino with code any more. So I downloaded the simplest sketch I could think of, the Blink sketch. That's the one that blinks on and off every half second.

The normal Arduino is a 16 MHz chip. Mine runs at a little over 32 MHz, and is a Duemilanove. Here's a little video of the "behind the scenes" of how I soldered the new crystal in:







I was pretty nervous putting the Arduino into the liquid coolant for the first time, so I loaded it up with the TempSensor, and had it kick back readings to the computer as long as it could. You can't really tell from the video, but the liquid is freezing cold. The tips of my fingers were a bit numb after a few videos :-)



Anyway, these are probably my favorite pictures of the project - I uploaded some more pictures over at flickr:



:-)

Operazioni consentite da qui:

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Bussola per arduino

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tramite Liquidware Antipasto di Justin il 19/02/10

The Compass Sensor is the latest joint project stemming from collaborative engineering between Liquidware and Modern Device.

On the bus ride from New York to Washington DC, it occurred to me how (relatively) easy it is to find our way from one place to another, regardless of distance. There's a well designated interstate highway system, filled with signs and rest stops where I can easily find out exactly where I am.

Most drivers are privy to state-of-the-art GPS navigation systems that read directions aloud, in real time, like a captain who simply knows it all. As a passenger, I had my iPhone, which allows me to triangulate my location with impressive accuracy via cellular signals and cell tower positions. In fact, it even had line by line walking directions (it would take me almost 3 days) and a course automatically charted out for me in a matter of seconds.

photo

I couldn't help wondering how people traveled and *explored* in a time when not everything was clearly, accurately, and dynamically charted. Roads were probably not well labeled, if at all, and traveling across an ocean when you thought the world was flat was probably an endeavor filled with uncertainty.

Even today, navigation is a much bigger deal at sea, where there are no roads, no landmarks, no signs, and no cell phone signals. And if for some reason my vessel is hit by an electromagnetic pulse, I'll be left with nothing but Pencil, Paper, and Stars.
pencilpaperstars
1. Macgyver's compass

Without an actual compass handy, Macgyver might default to a tried and true 4th grade science experiment: making your own compass. The premise is simple: run one side of a magnet over a thin piece of metal (like a needle) several times, always in the same direction. This magnetizes the needle, which when pushed through a piece of cork or straw and placed in water, will be free to float and spin to point north. Caveat: the temporary magnetism diminishes over time and this procedure needs to be repeated every couple days.

2. Following the North Star

Following the stars has been a way of navigation on land and at sea for ages. Polaris, also known as the North Star, is useful because it is bright and holds a constant position at the celestial pole. Its location at the pole means that its position in the sky isn't impacted by the daily rotation of the earth, making it a perfect landmark on a clear night.

3. Dead Reckoning and the Traverse Board

Making use of pencil and paper, dead reckoning and the traverse board are a method of tracking position traveled. Starting from a known position, a chip log or weight would be attached to a reel of rope with knots tied in it at pre-defined spaces (hence the term nautical "knots"). The speed of the boat would then be tracked by counting the number of knots that had passed over an interval of time. Combined with recordings of orientation with a compass, a crew could track the path of the boat.

4. Using a watch as a "Sun Compass"

Yet another way to determine North, especially during the day, was to hold a watch with the hour hand facing the sun. Bisecting the angle between 12 and the current hour creates a North-South line – the further of which is North.

Make a Compass with the Sun and Time

5. Use an Arduino and a Compass SensorSONY DSCComing back into the digital world, here's the Compass Sensor for the Arduino. Like the Temp Sensor, it comes as a kit with either 4-pin male or stack-through headers that sit directly on the Arduino analog pins A2-A5. The compass sensor library is included in the latest release of the Antipasto Arduino IDE, which has updates for the Temp Sensor library as well. To get started, I simply installed the updated IDE and ran the Arduino compass library to start getting directional heading readouts from serial.

SONY DSC DSC08151

The Compass also communicates over the I2C protocol, and the data pin is bidirectional. In fact, multiple sensors can be stacked to communicate over the same analog pins on the Arduino, which I'll write up soon.

I took a video comparing the Compass Sensor with an analog compass, and lined both up for a quick demo:

Paul's posted the Compass Sensor over at the Modern Device shop. In the meantime, I'm planning to do a couple more projects with the compass sensor next week, and I'm open to any thoughts or suggestions – jhuynh at gmail



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Come diventare l'uomo ragno con un'aspirapolvere

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tramite HacknMod.com - You name it. We hack it. di Saikat il 17/02/10

A BBC scientist created an impressive homebrew wall climbing system from a simple vacuum cleaner. The creator demonstrated his Spiderman prowess by climbing up the 120 feet facade of BBC Television center in the video below. He documented his experience in these videos and images.

He used the suction power of a modified vacuum cleaner motor to hold his weight on the wall. The pads were able to easily hold his 170 pound body. Using this shoulder harnessed contraption, he scaled one of BBC's buildings (he fell once because of traffic pollution on the buildings).

We won't advocate that you try this at home without proper knowledge or safety gear but hey, it's pretty incredible stuff.

More Climbing Projects:



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Pyxis OS, un sistema operativo per Arduino

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tramite Electronics-Lab.com Blog di admin il 02/02/10

Pyxis OS is an amazing arduino based operating system. Based around the Arduino hardware platform, it adds some pretty impressive features, such as the ability to run programs from an SD card, read/write to a FAT filesystem, and easily display graphics and GUI elements on a color LCD. [via]

Pyxis OS, an operating system for Arduino - [Link]



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Sensore di temperatura con Arduino

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tramite Liquidware Antipasto di Matt il 16/02/10
A bunch of people have written in to say they are enjoying the new TempSensor (ps thanks Rich for the bug fix in the code, now it works perfectly), and that makes me and Justin and Paul and Chris quite happy. It was an Open Source Hardware collaboration from start to finish, sharing schematics and code with each other. The goal was to create a set of sensors that were bullet proof.

Chris also spent a bunch of time coding up a special version of the Antipasto Arduino IDE (the Antipasto branch of the Arduino IDE), so that anyone who wants can literally pick up the TempSensor, wire it into analog ports 2, 3, 4 and 5, and be up and running in no time.

Here's proof:

Step 1: Download the Antipasto Arduino IDE

First download the Arduino IDE from here.

Install it and test out a simple Blink sketch on the Arduino to ensure that it works

Step 2: Connect the TempSensor to the Arduino

Insert the pins so that the TempSensor is facing downwards, off the bottom of the Arduino.

The TempSensor's pins should be placed into the Arduino's analog header, into pins 2, 3, 4, and 5.

Step 3: Load the Example Code


This is from the File->Examples->Library-LibTemperature->GetLocalTemperature menu option.


/****************************
* GetLocalTemperature
* An example sketch that prints the
* local temperature to the PC's serial port
*
* Tested with the TMP421-Breakout
* Temperature Sensor from Modern Device
*****************************/
#include "Wire.h"
#include

LibTemperature temp = LibTemperature(0);

void setup() {
Serial.begin(9600);
}

void loop() {
Serial.print("Temp: ");
Serial.print(temp.GetTemperature());
Serial.println(" degC");
delay(100);
}




Step 4: Hit Compile

This is the little triangular button.


Step 5: Download the Program to the Arduino

Select the right port, and the right Arduino board, naturally, and then press download.

Step 6: Open the Serial Terminal

And you'll see something like this:


Voila!



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